World Curlew Day - current BTO research into territories and habitat

WOS today has called for urgent action to save the Curlew from extinction ahead of World Curlew Day on Saturday, 21st April. Curlews with their long curved bills are Britain’s largest wading birds. Their plaintive calls, celebrated in both verse and music, are the sound of Wales’ wild habitats – a haunting song which is the springtime music of our uplands, moorlands, marshes and seacoasts. But so fast has been their fall in numbers that the Curlew has now been put on the Red List of the UK’s most endangered birds. Over the last 22 years the Curlew has declined by more by more than 80 per cent in Wales and it is now sliding rapidly towards extinction. That there is overwhelming support for the Curlew was shown by the attendance at a recent conference where conservationists came together with farmers, landowners, gamekeepers and scientists to discuss what action is necessary. WOS Chair, Mick Green, said “WOS welcomes the recent statement from the Environment Minister that she is committed to halting biodiversity loss. We have today written to her asking to show that commitment by fully funding the actions recommended by the Curlew Conference to save the Curlew in Wales”. WOS President, Iolo Williams added “The Curlew was part of the soundtrack of my childhood – it is vital we save this iconic species for generations to come”. The BTO is currently conducting research into Curlew habitat and breeding territories in North Wales and you can read Katharine Bowgen’s account of it here.

Curlews in danger - summer records urgently required

It is estimated that since the 1990’s, Wales has lost up to 80% of its breeding Curlew population. It is widely considered that there may now be less than 400 breeding pairs in Wales. Curlews are rapidly edging towards extinction as a breeding species in our country and we urgently require information to locate breeding pairs and target conservation measures to protect them. The North Wales Curlew Action Group need you to report sightings of this highly endangered bird during the breeding season (April-July) in North Wales to assess their numbers and improve their conservation. For further details, please go to the COFNOD page here.

Scarce sightings from January to March 2018

The highlight of the past three months has been the second Welsh record of a Snowy Owl, photographed here at St David’s at the end of March. There were sightings in several other places, but it’s not certain whether they all refer to the same bird or not. There were good numbers of scarce gulls and ducks as well. Full details of scarce and rare sightings can be seen here.

 
 
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Events for birdwatchers in Wales

Apr
27
Fri
Wrexham Birdwatchers Group : Weekend away at the Somerset Levels.
Apr 27 – Apr 30 all-day

Meet at Belle Vue Garage, Wrexham LL13 7NU.
For more information contact Kevin Smith on kevjsmith3@hotmail.com or 01978 354551.

Feb
28
Thu
WOS – Small Grant Scheme. Closing date for applications.
Feb 28 all-day

Notes for Applicants
• Applications must be made using the form (available in MS Word from November).
• Projects must take place within Wales.
• The grant can pay for costs of the project such as materials, research and surveys including travel expenses, habitat management and technical advice. It should not pay for core funding for a group, nor for telescopes or binoculars to undertake fieldwork.
• The funding must be used for biodiversity conservation work and not to fulfil any existing agreements such as Service-level agreements, agri-environment works, planning obligations.
• Any individual or non–profit group or organisation may apply. If you are applying on behalf of a non-constituted group and therefore do not have a bank account (such as a Biodiversity Action Group), you may nominate an organisation to administer the project finances. Eligible organisations include Local Authorities, Registered Charities, and Government Organisations.
• A nominated person must sign the application form accepting the conditions of grant on behalf of those involved in the project.
• The applicant must supply adequate information to justify the project.
• Grants will be made in two parts: half before the project and half upon receipt of a report on the work.

Forfurthe detail please go to -https://birdsin.wales/what-we-do/small-grant-scheme/

Feb
28
Fri
WOS – Small Grant Scheme. Closing date for applications.
Feb 28 all-day

Notes for Applicants
• Applications must be made using the form (available in MS Word from November).
• Projects must take place within Wales.
• The grant can pay for costs of the project such as materials, research and surveys including travel expenses, habitat management and technical advice. It should not pay for core funding for a group, nor for telescopes or binoculars to undertake fieldwork.
• The funding must be used for biodiversity conservation work and not to fulfil any existing agreements such as Service-level agreements, agri-environment works, planning obligations.
• Any individual or non–profit group or organisation may apply. If you are applying on behalf of a non-constituted group and therefore do not have a bank account (such as a Biodiversity Action Group), you may nominate an organisation to administer the project finances. Eligible organisations include Local Authorities, Registered Charities, and Government Organisations.
• A nominated person must sign the application form accepting the conditions of grant on behalf of those involved in the project.
• The applicant must supply adequate information to justify the project.
• Grants will be made in two parts: half before the project and half upon receipt of a report on the work.

Forfurthe detail please go to -https://birdsin.wales/what-we-do/small-grant-scheme/

Feb
28
Sun
WOS – Small Grant Scheme. Closing date for applications.
Feb 28 all-day

Notes for Applicants
• Applications must be made using the form (available in MS Word from November).
• Projects must take place within Wales.
• The grant can pay for costs of the project such as materials, research and surveys including travel expenses, habitat management and technical advice. It should not pay for core funding for a group, nor for telescopes or binoculars to undertake fieldwork.
• The funding must be used for biodiversity conservation work and not to fulfil any existing agreements such as Service-level agreements, agri-environment works, planning obligations.
• Any individual or non–profit group or organisation may apply. If you are applying on behalf of a non-constituted group and therefore do not have a bank account (such as a Biodiversity Action Group), you may nominate an organisation to administer the project finances. Eligible organisations include Local Authorities, Registered Charities, and Government Organisations.
• A nominated person must sign the application form accepting the conditions of grant on behalf of those involved in the project.
• The applicant must supply adequate information to justify the project.
• Grants will be made in two parts: half before the project and half upon receipt of a report on the work.

Forfurthe detail please go to -https://birdsin.wales/what-we-do/small-grant-scheme/